PEERAGE NEWS

DARE TO DREAM

MILES NADAL’S ICONIC COLLECTION

STORY BY JORDAN LENSSEN
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL FURMAN & JORDAN LENSSEN
STORY COURTESY OF AUTOSTRADA MAGAZINE

I have an address and instructions where to meet Miles Nadal for our interview, though I’m unsure of the exact details, or what to expect. A global marketing magnate, over the last 30 years Nadal has made a name representing and helping shape the identities of the world’s biggest brands – from Nike to Calvin Klein, BMW to Chanel, to name just a few.

As I approach the gates to the parking lot, I see a sprawling building that I can only assume is some sort of warehouse or distribution centre. “The cars must be stored in the basement,” I thought. I’d previously caught wind of Mr. Nadal’s Dare to Dream collection through word of mouth. Until this article, there hasn’t been any hard proof of what to expect, so with a grain of salt on my brain, I park and make my way toward the building. As I get closer, I can faintly see the outlines of what appears to be Jeff Gordon’s DuPont livery through the tinted glass at the rear of the building.

“This is no warehouse,” I humbly correct myself. As staff members welcome me inside, I’m told I can browse the collection while Nadal makes his way in from the airport. After a business meeting in Montreal and a delay due to snow, Nadal had flown in to go over the collection with us specifically. I’m more than happy to have some alone time with what are some obviously fantastic machines. Prior to visiting, I heard a rumour of “the white booties” to protect your shoes from the delicate white floors. This turned out to be true. As I make my way into the large showroom entrance, I walk past a pristine piano black Bugatti Type 35 and towards two machines that either slip white boots over your shoes, or melt a plastic sheet around your sole, all in an effort to protect the soft, white epoxy floor from being damaged or scuffed – which, after seeing how impeccable it is, is completely understandable.

Mr. Nadal (along with certain staffers) is the only one allowed on the floor without any shoe coverings, but only because he has a fresh pair of indoor shoes ready and waiting.

As I walk around, I’m joined by Autostrada publisher Sean Patrick, who points out a few pieces in the collection that might

have slipped my eye otherwise: first is a flawless orange 1914 Flying Merkel 61-cid V-twin, a breakthrough in motorcycle suspension design, as well as being one of the most successful racers of its era, featuring the lever Eclipse clutch, to regulate engine acceleration from the single-speedster.

Second is a 1966 Sunbeam Tiger, a car that, while unobtrusive in its looks, was built in partnership with Carroll Shelby and carried a Ford V8 and numerous handling upgrades. Soon after the “cut-rate Cobra” hit the market, Chrysler bought the automaker, thus killing the Shelby partnership and making these hi-po roadsters quite unique.

We also note the quotes adorning the walls throughout the facility, of which Nadal is an avid collector and reciter.

Just as we’re wandering into a fine collection of Jaguars, Nadal enters and extends a warm welcome before asking us for a few more minutes, as his recent travel schedule had him away from Toronto and his most recent delivery, a McLaren 720S. We’d planned a long visit, so any additional chance to pour over the collection was welcome. It also gives us a unique introspective as to just how much care and consideration Nadal puts into each of his cars.

Returning from the Jaguar collection and a stunning pair of Mercedes-Benz 300 SLs (one Gullwing and one Roadster), we see Nadal and his team examining the finest details of his latest acquisition. In bare trim, the McLaren 720S is a big deal, but Nadal commissioned McLaren Special Operations (MSO) to make his one of a kind – including a flecked Gulf livery perfectly matched to his McLaren PI, Ford GT, and Triumph Rocket III Roadster, and he’s making sure the final spec is just as he wants. When he’s completed his inspection, we make our way to one of the boardroom tables in the Motorsport Library, where you’ll find comprehensive material on every sports and supercar manufacturer and their subsequent racing programs. If you look closer, you’ll find racing school certificates in Nadal’s name, as well as personal tokens including pictures with his parents at track events, and a framed collection of Matchbox cars from his childhood, sitting behind letters of recognition for his vast educational and community contributions. “If we’re going back to where it really started, for me it was James Bond,” Nadal says, pointing back towards a display case protecting a 007 Spy suitcase, complete with a decoder kit, pistol, silencer and other sleuthing tools. “I was around 8 when I received that set for my birthday. It was around the same time the Aston Martin DB5 was released, and I said to myself, ‘One day I’d like to own that car.”

Now he does, and while we’re sitting amongst that, a one of 100 Zagato DB AR1, and an impeccable red on gold Muira P400 SV with a blue leather interior (one of 150), it’s hard not to get distracted by the sheer beauty and rarity of these cars. “These are the epitome of art,” Nadal says. “I love to collect art, and for me, cars are every bit as artistic as any painting, except you can also touch, feel, and experience these.”

Nadal comes by his keen eye honestly. At 12 the young entrepreneur started Action Photographies, shooting nature, sports, and summer camps. By 16, he had four staff members. Naturally, Nadal parlayed that into an entrepreneurial photography business, and it was an offer to shoot the latest CCM hockey catalogue that became his major turning point. “They said if I wanted to shoot the catalogue, you have to do it all – the photography, the design, the production. I said, ‘Oh, I think I can do that.”

What that experience, and a $500 investment from his Visa card, Nadal created his own agency/holding company, MDC, or Marketing, Design, Communications (eventually becoming Multi-Discipline Communications), and began investing in marketing agencies and highly-specialized print companies. His business successes also led to a first in his family: a new car. Nadal had purchased a 1980 Pontiac Grand Prix, complete with a $2,500 phone option, and finished in silver with a velvet blue landau top and matching interior.

When business continued to grow, Nadal gave his mom the Grand Prix and graduated to a Mercedes-Benz 190E. Meeting with renowned limousine builder Mel Stein of A.H.A. Automotive Technologies of Brampton, Nadal told him he’d like to have a driver and sit in the back seat. By 1987 the two had gone public, and Nadal hasn’t looked back since. “We went public the day before Black Monday, on Friday, October 16th of ’87.

So as Friedrich Nietzsche said, ‘That which does not kill us, makes us stronger,'” he says. Over the next decade, Nadal would oversee MDC’s atmospheric rise to the top of the marketing chain, obtaining and becoming the majority shareholder of some of the continent’s largest ad and marketing agencies. That success led to what Nadal calls his first collector car purchase, a 1998 Aston Martin DB7. It wasn’t long after that his collection slowly started to grow. “Shortly after I bought the DB7, my friend Steven Hershenhorn was in California, and I asked him to find me another car, so he brought back a 1972 Mercedes 280 3.5-litre 5-seater convertible, chocolate brown on cognac. Coincidentally, that was the first car that Ralph Lauren ever bought.” With his professional career off and running, Nadal shifted his focus to giving back to his community. “I came from very humble beginnings,” he says. “I’m also very fortunate to be in the position I’m in, so to be able to give back is a wonderful experience.”

Nadal has been a key member and contributor to a number of initiatives and social programs in the Greater Toronto Area, including the York University Miles S. Nadal Management Centre downtown, the Leadership Sinai program, the Miles & Kelly Nadal Youth Centre in Regent Park, and the Miles S. Nadal Jewish Community Centre in uptown Toronto – the same location which helped him start his photography business at age 12.

More often than not, his charitable endeavours are aimed at helping the less fortunate, and most often adolescent and teens in urban Toronto.

“So often, I see a younger version of myself in these kids,” Nadal says. “I didn’t come from much, so it’s great to be able to provide some support or assistance to help them on their journey ahead.

“In fact, there’s a great quote about children that I really appreciate,” Nadal continues. “’One hundred years from now, no one will remember the car you drove, the house you lived in, for that matter how much money you had in the bank, but the world will be a different place if you make a difference in the life of the young’,” he recites off the top of his head.

As the years continued to count, so too did the cars in Nadal’s collection, and in 2010, he started enjoying collecting as a more serious hobby. “That’s when the collection really started to take shape,” Nadal says. “I bought a ’64 Porsche 356 Coupe, a Bentley Azure Wide Body and a 550 Maranello that year. I didn’t have a huge collection, but they were cars that I loved, and it felt like it was the beginning of something much bigger.”

“What was the first car that I bought that I said to you, ‘this is getting serious now’?,” Nadal asks Joey Altomare, master detailer of the collection and an encyclopedia of car knowledge. “The Gullwing in 2012,” Altomare says.

“I think at that point we had 21 cars at the old location, and that car came in and it went from fun to serious, to now becoming a real collection.” Nadal always had a penchant for the 300 SL, but that purchase was spawned after meetings with some of the world’s – and North America’s greatest collectors in Jay Leno and Ralph Lauren.“I met with Jay on Saturday February 23, 2012 – I remember because that’s my birthday,” Nadal says. “His collection was incredible, but it was funny because he wasn’t all that protective over his cars. But he had a fantastic location, and it really had me thinking about a real home for my collection.

“That was accelerated later that fall when I went to see Ralph Lauren. That was a real page-turner for me, because it was truly a spectacular collection. “It was Ralph who told me to get what I like, not necessarily what was original. I asked ‘Doesn’t that mean it’s going to be worth less?’ And he said, ‘Perhaps, but that’s a problem for my estate to deal with.; That really helped to shape my mentality about collecting,” Nadal says. After seeing Lauren’s collection, Nadal hunted down a 300 SL Gullwing, and as an ode to his collecting mentor, commissioned 300 SL specialist Rudi Koniczek of British Columbia, who matched the designers’ Gullwing colours perfectly. “When I returned home, I rented a second building, but we were always between the two,” Nadal says. “And going back to what Jay had, what Ralph had, what Lee Munder had, and Bruce Meyer… I wanted to have an integrated facility where our businesses and the collection could operate together.” His vision came to fruition in the fall of 2014, when Nadal says “things took a life unto themselves.” “We had plans for the showroom, the theatre and the racing simulator, but I realized we were going to run out of space…”

So Nadal bought the adjacent building, which acts as his spa and service centre. When he moved in, Nadal was still on the cusp of crafting his Dare to Dream collection, and to properly christen his new facility, he bought his first supercar – a low-kilometre Bugatti Veyron from entertainment mogul, Simon Cowell. At Pebble Beach in 2013, Leno had also convinced Nadal to look into the McLaren P1, and after working closely with the manufacturer’s previous head of design, Frank Stephenson, the two came up with the flecked Gulf livery car, complete with numerous custom touches throughout.

He bought the Fiat 500L Popemobile, which promptly frightened me when I came in contact with the Pope manikin sitting inside. On the more ‘traditional’ fair, he has a myriad of Porsche 356s and Carreras, Kenny Bernstein’s 300+ MPH funny car, and his Ferrari collection, which sits front and centre in the studio, and adjacent to his glass encased office.“It became very clear to me after talking to Tom Hartley Jr. and Ralph Lauren that you can’t have a real collection without Ferraris,” Nadal says.

“And I love them, but you can’t just buy one, you have to buy at least five – the 288, F40, F50, Enzo and the LaFerrari.” At the back wall next to a pair of slant noses (a RUF 930 Turbo Cabriolet and 930 Turbo), is a hand-made, 1:8 scale model collection of Ralph Lauren’s car collection.

Tucked away on the opposite side of the room is perhaps the cleanest build I’ve ever seen: Chip Foose’s “Little Foose Coupe,” which prompted the famed builder to come and visit Nadal’s facility. Once you walk past the giant Spirit of Speed statue, the results are truly awe inspiring, to enthusiasts new and old. “Not only did the staff and clients appreciate it, but I started getting calls from all over the place about the collection,” Nadal says. “I didn’t think about it as a commercial endeavour – it was more like the Warren Buffett ‘tap dancing to work’ mentality.

I underestimated the amount of interest that people would have in it.” As a result, Nadal has opened his collection for private viewings for enthusiasts and children alike, and each one walks away with a special 341-page coffee table book entitled ICONIC, showcasing his most significant pieces of his collection, with incredible imagery and details of each vehicle. “I’ve never sold a car from my collection, nor do I intend to, but if a car is in this book, it’s here to stay,” Nadal laughs.

Ask him what the most sentimental car in his collection might be? “My Dad’s favourite car in the world was a ’56 Thunderbird, so that’s a very special car for me” Miles says. “He never owned a car a day in my life. He would take the bus to work every day, but I remember how much he loved that car.” It’s just another example of the thought and care put in to making the collection a complete experience for himself, his family, and each of his visitors. “I think that’s where I’m different,”

Nadal says. “The entire collection and the environment are as important to me as the actual cars. I think very few people spend as much time and effort on the beautification of the facility as my team and I have devoted. It takes a small village to keep and maintain this collection. To me, this place is the actual enjoyment. If it was just a garage, the cars would still be the same, but we wouldn’t be sitting here enjoying ourselves as much as we are.” And enjoying ourselves we surely were. It just goes to show what one can accomplish when they “dare to dream.”

DARE TO DREAM

MILES NADAL’S ICONIC COLLECTION

STORY BY JORDAN LENSSEN
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL FURMAN & JORDAN LENSSEN
STORY COURTESY OF AUTOSTRADA.COM

I have an address and instructions where to meet Miles Nadal for our interview, though I’m unsure of the exact details, or what to expect. A global marketing magnate, over the last 30 years Nadal has made a name representing and helping shape the identities of the world’s biggest brands – from Nike to Calvin Klein, BMW to Chanel, to name just a few.

As I approach the gates to the parking lot, I see a sprawling building that I can only assume is some sort of warehouse or distribution centre. “The cars must be stored in the basement,” I thought. I’d previously caught wind of Mr. Nadal’s Dare to Dream collection through word of mouth. Until this article, there hasn’t been any hard proof of what to expect, so with a grain of salt on my brain, I park and make my way toward the building. As I get closer, I can faintly see the outlines of what appears to be Jeff Gordon’s DuPont livery through the tinted glass at the rear of the building.

 

“This is no warehouse,” I humbly correct myself. As staff members welcome me inside, I’m told I can browse the collection while Nadal makes his way in from the airport. After a business meeting in Montreal and a delay due to snow, Nadal had flown in to go over the collection with us specifically. I’m more than happy to have some alone time with what are some obviously fantastic machines. Prior to visiting, I heard a rumour of “the white booties” to protect your shoes from the delicate white floors. This turned out to be true. As I make my way into the large showroom entrance, I walk past a pristine piano black Bugatti Type 35 and towards two machines that either slip white boots over your shoes, or melt a plastic sheet around your sole, all in an effort to protect the soft, white epoxy floor from being damaged or scuffed – which, after seeing how impeccable it is, is completely understandable.

 

Mr. Nadal (along with certain staffers) is the only one allowed on the floor without any shoe coverings, but only because he has a fresh pair of indoor shoes ready and waiting.

As I walk around, I’m joined by Autostrada publisher Sean Patrick, who points out a few pieces in the collection that might

have slipped my eye otherwise: first is a flawless orange 1914 Flying Merkel 61-cid V-twin, a breakthrough in motorcycle suspension design, as well as being one of the most successful racers of its era, featuring the lever Eclipse clutch, to regulate engine acceleration from the single-speedster.

 

Second is a 1966 Sunbeam Tiger, a car that, while unobtrusive in its looks, was built in partnership with Carroll Shelby and carried a Ford V8 and numerous handling upgrades. Soon after the “cut-rate Cobra” hit the market, Chrysler bought the automaker, thus killing the Shelby partnership and making these hi-po roadsters quite unique.

We also note the quotes adorning the walls throughout the facility, of which Nadal is an avid collector and reciter.

 

Just as we’re wandering into a fine collection of Jaguars, Nadal enters and extends a warm welcome before asking us for a few more minutes, as his recent travel schedule had him away from Toronto and his most recent delivery, a McLaren 720S. We’d planned a long visit, so any additional chance to pour over the collection was welcome. It also gives us a unique introspective as to just how much care and consideration Nadal puts into each of his cars.

 

Returning from the Jaguar collection and a stunning pair of Mercedes-Benz 300 SLs (one Gullwing and one Roadster), we see Nadal and his team examining the finest  details of his latest acquisition. In bare trim, the McLaren 720S is a big deal, but Nadal commissioned McLaren Special Operations (MSO) to make his one of a kind – including a flecked Gulf livery perfectly matched to his McLaren PI, Ford GT, and Triumph Rocket III Roadster, and he’s making sure the final spec is just as he wants. When he’s completed his inspection, we make our way to one of the boardroom tables in the Motorsport Library, where you’ll find comprehensive material on every sports and supercar manufacturer and their subsequent racing programs. If you look closer, you’ll find racing school certificates in Nadal’s name, as well as personal tokens including pictures with his parents at track events, and a framed collection of Matchbox cars from his childhood, sitting behind letters of recognition for his vast educational and community contributions. “If we’re going back to where it really started, for me it was James Bond,” Nadal says, pointing back towards a display case protecting a 007 Spy suitcase, complete with a decoder kit, pistol, silencer and other sleuthing tools. “I was around 8 when I received that set for my birthday. It was around the same time the Aston Martin DB5 was released, and I said to myself, ‘One day I’d like to own that car.”

 

Now he does, and while we’re sitting amongst that, a one of 100 Zagato DB AR1, and an impeccable red on gold Muira P400 SV with a blue leather interior (one of 150), it’s hard not to get distracted by the sheer beauty and rarity of these cars. “These are the epitome of art,” Nadal says. “I love to collect art, and for me, cars are every bit as artistic as any painting, except you can also touch, feel, and experience these.”

 

Nadal comes by his keen eye honestly. At 12 the young entrepreneur started Action Photographies, shooting nature, sports, and summer camps. By 16, he had four staff members. Naturally, Nadal parlayed that into an entrepreneurial photography business, and it was an offer to shoot the latest CCM hockey catalogue that became his major turning point. “They said if I wanted to shoot the catalogue, you have to do it all – the photography, the design, the production. I said, ‘Oh, I think I can do that.”

 

What that experience, and a $500 investment from his Visa card, Nadal created his own agency/holding company, MDC, or Marketing, Design, Communications (eventually becoming Multi-Discipline Communications), and began investing in marketing agencies and highly-specialized print companies. His business successes also led to a first in his family: a new car. Nadal had purchased a 1980 Pontiac Grand Prix, complete with a $2,500 phone option, and finished in silver with a velvet blue landau top and matching interior.

 

When business continued to grow, Nadal gave his mom the Grand Prix and graduated to a Mercedes-Benz 190E. Meeting with renowned limousine builder Mel Stein of A.H.A. Automotive Technologies of Brampton, Nadal told him he’d like to have a driver and sit in the back seat. By 1987 the two had gone public, and Nadal hasn’t looked back since. “We went public the day before Black Monday, on Friday, October 16th of ’87.

 

So as Friedrich Nietzsche said, ‘That which does not kill us, makes us stronger,'” he says. Over the next decade, Nadal would oversee MDC’s atmospheric rise to the top of the marketing chain, obtaining and becoming the majority shareholder of some of the continent’s largest ad and marketing agencies. That success led to what Nadal calls his first collector car purchase, a 1998 Aston Martin DB7. It wasn’t long after that his collection slowly started to grow. “Shortly after I bought the DB7, my friend Steven Hershenhorn was in California, and I asked him to find me another car, so he brought back a 1972 Mercedes 280 3.5-litre 5-seater convertible, chocolate brown on cognac. Coincidentally, that was the first car that Ralph Lauren ever bought.” With his professional career off and running, Nadal shifted his focus to giving back to his community. “I came from very humble beginnings,” he says. “I’m also very fortunate to be in the position I’m in, so to be able to give back is a wonderful experience.”

 

Nadal has been a key member and contributor to a number of initiatives and social programs in the Greater Toronto Area, including the York University Miles S. Nadal Management Centre downtown, the Leadership Sinai program, the Miles & Kelly Nadal Youth Centre in Regent Park, and the Miles S. Nadal Jewish Community Centre in uptown Toronto – the same location which helped him start his photography business at age 12.

 

More often than not, his charitable endeavours are aimed at helping the less fortunate, and most often adolescent and teens in urban Toronto.

 

“So often, I see a younger version of myself in these kids,” Nadal says. “I didn’t come from much, so it’s great to be able to provide some support or assistance to help them on their journey ahead.

 

“In fact, there’s a great quote about children that I really appreciate,” Nadal continues. “’One hundred years from now, no one will remember the car you drove, the house you lived in, for that matter how much money you had in the bank, but the world will be a different place if you make a difference in the life of the young’,” he recites off the top of his head.

 

As the years continued to count, so too did the cars in Nadal’s collection, and in 2010, he started enjoying collecting as a more serious hobby. “That’s when the collection really started to take shape,” Nadal says. “I bought a ’64 Porsche 356 Coupe, a Bentley Azure Wide Body and a 550 Maranello that year. I didn’t have a huge collection, but they were cars that I loved, and it felt like it was the beginning of something much bigger.”

 

“What was the first car that I bought that I said to you, ‘this is getting serious now’?,” Nadal asks Joey Altomare, master detailer of the collection and an encyclopaedia of car knowledge. “The Gullwing in 2012,” Altomare says.

 

“I think at that point we had 21 cars at the old location, and that car came in and it went from fun to serious, to now becoming a real collection.” Nadal always had a penchant for the 300 SL, but that purchase was spawned after a meetings with some of the world’s – and North America’s greatest collectors in Jay Leno and Ralph Lauren.“I met with Jay on Saturday February 23, 2012 – I remember because that’s my birthday,” Nadal says. “His collection was incredible, but it was funny because he wasn’t all that protective over his cars. But he had a fantastic location, and it really had me thinking about a real home for my collection.

 

“That was accelerated later that fall when I went to see Ralph Lauren. That was a real page-turner for me, because it was truly a spectacular collection. “It was Ralph who told me to get what I like, not necessarily what was original. I asked ‘Doesn’t that mean it’s going to be worth less?’ And he said, ‘Perhaps, but that’s a problem for my estate to deal with.; That really helped to shaped my mentality about collecting,” Nadal says. After seeing Lauren’s collection, Nadal hunted down a 300 SL Gullwing, and as an ode to his collecting mentor, commissioned 300 SL specialist Rudi Koniczek of British Columbia, who matched the designers’ Gullwing colours perfectly. “When I returned home, I rented a second building, but we were always between the two,” Nadal says. “And going back to what Jay had, what Ralph had, what Lee Munder had, and Bruce Meyer… I wanted to have an integrated facility where our businesses and the collection could operate together.” His vision came to fruition in the fall of 2014, when Nadal says “things took a life unto themselves.” “We had plans for the showroom, the theatre and the racing simulator, but I realized we were going to run out of space…”

 

So Nadal bought the adjacent building, which acts as his spa and service centre. When he moved in, Nadal was still on the cusp of crafting his Dare to Dream collection, and to properly christen his new facility, he bought his first supercar – a low-kilometre Bugatti Veyron from entertainment mogul, Simon Cowell. At Pebble Beach in 2013, Leno had also convinced Nadal to look into the McLaren P1, and after working closely with the manufacturer’s previous head of design, Frank Stephenson, the two came up with the flecked Gulf livery car, complete with numerous custom touches throughout.

 

He bought the Fiat 500L Popemobile, which promptly frightened me when I came in contact with the Pope manikin sitting inside. On the more ‘traditional’ fair, he has a myriad of Porsche 356s and Carreras, Kenny Bernstein’s 300+ MPH funny car, and his Ferrari collection, which sits front and centre in the studio, and adjacent to his glass encased office.“It became very clear to me after talking to Tom Hartley Jr. and Ralph Lauren that you can’t have a real collection without Ferraris,” Nadal says.

 

“And I love them, but you can’t just buy one, you have to buy at least five – the 288, F40, F50, Enzo and the LaFerrari.” At the back wall next to a pair of slant noses (a RUF 930 Turbo Cabriolet and 930 Turbo), is a hand-made, 1:8 scale model collection of Ralph Lauren’s car collection.

 

Tucked away on the opposite side of the room is perhaps the cleanest build I’ve ever seen: Chip Foose’s “Little Foose Coupe,” which prompted the famed builder to come and visit Nadal’s facility. Once you walk passed the giant Spirit of Speed statue, the results are truly aweinspiring, to enthusiasts new and old. “Not only did the staff and clients appreciate it, but I started getting calls from all over the place about the collection,” Nadal says. “I didn’t think about it as a commercial endeavour – it was more like the Warren Buffett ‘tap dancing to work’ mentality.

 

I underestimated the amount of interest that people would have in it.” As a result, Nadal has opened his collection for private viewings for enthusiasts and children alike, and each one walks away with a special 341-page coffee table book entitled ICONIC, showcasing his most significant pieces of his collection, with incredible imagery and details of each vehicle. “I’ve never sold a car from my collection, nor do I intend to, but if a car is in this book, it’s here to stay,” Nadal laughs.

 

Ask him what the most sentimental car in his collection might be? “My Dad’s favourite car in the world was a ’56 Thunderbird, so that’s a very special car for me” Miles says. “He never owned a car a day in my life. He would take the bus to work every day, but I remember how much he loved that car.” It’s just another example of the thought and care put in to making the collection a complete experience for himself, his family, and each of his visitors. “I think that’s where I’m different,”

 

Nadal says. “The entire collection and the environment are as important to me as the actual cars. I think very few people spend as much time and effort on the beautification of the facility as my team and I have devoted. It takes a small village to keep and maintain this collection. To me, this place is the actual enjoyment. If it was just a garage, the cars would still be the same, but we wouldn’t be sitting here enjoying ourselves as much as we are.” And enjoying ourselves we surely were. It just goes to show what one can accomplish when they “dare to dream.”

A VISIT TO THE MILES NADAL JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE

On November 8, 2018 the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre hosted Peerage Capital Founder and philanthropist Miles S. Nadal for a candid Q&A with the MNJCC staff. Miles was thrilled to be able to visit a place that is so meaningful to him...

MILES S. NADAL AND PEERAGE CAPITAL WELCOME DAVID KOHLER

On Thursday November 8th, Miles S. Nadal and Peerage Capital were honoured to host David Kohler, President & CEO of Kohler Co for an intimate fireside chat. Guests were invited to interact with Kohler displays including a blue tooth mirror that projects the voice of Alexa and striking state of the art faucets and sinks…

“Peerage is the epitome of entrepreneurial spirit and has consistently supported and encouraged Baker’s tradition of thinking outside the box. This has resulted in Baker taking bold steps in technology innovation, increasing sales and tremendous growth in revenue.”

Barbara Lawlor,
CEO and President,
Baker Real Estate Incorporated, Brokerage

“Peerage Capital has had a dramatic influence on cultivating an entrepreneurial spirit and focus at Chestnut Park. There is a pervasive encouragement to grow, but on our terms and time lines. Success is recognized and rewarded. Help is available if needed. Peerage proveds the perfect combination of independence and security.”

Chris Kapches,
LLB, President and CEO, Broker of Record,
Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage

“We were looking for a like-minded group to partner with to assist with our continued success. We found that in Peerage Realty Partners. We remain independent and retain our identity while being able to take advantage of the benefits of being part of the Peerage Realty Partners group.”

Catherine Deluce,
Founder and Chair,
Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage

“From the inception of our partnership, Peerage made it clear by both their words and actions that while they would always be available to discuss business strategies or financial assistance, they trusted us to manage our company competently, ethically and efficiently. They are partners in every sense of the word.”

Michael Schaenen,
Senior Partner,
ARS Investment Partners,

“Peerage provided us with all the resources and support to allow us to grow at lightning speed and with precision. Partnering with Peerage Capital has made us a force to be reckoned with in the real estate industry.”

Mary Johnson,
Vice President,
StreetCity Realty Inc., Brokerage

“Peerage Capital provides ARS Investment Partners with the right balance of operating autonomy and strategic support. Peerage recognizes and respects the expertise and judgment of the ARS management team, and allow us to do what we do best.”

Stephen Burke,
Managing Partner,
ARS Investment Partners

“Through our partnership with Peerage we are able to retain our independence while benefitting from the support of their seasoned senior management team and having access to Peerage’s valuable network.”

Rob Furse,
President,
Echelon Wealth Partners

CONTACT US

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